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Thermal Comfort


Intent: The WELL Thermal Comfort concept aims to promote human productivity and ensure a maximum level of thermal comfort among all building users through improved HVAC system design and control and by meeting individual thermal preferences.

 

WKU Points Achieved in the Thermal Feature


 

Intent: Ensure that the majority of building users find the thermal environment acceptable.

This WELL feature requires projects to create indoor thermal environments that provide comfortable thermal conditions to the majority of people in support of their health, well-being and productivity.

  • Support Thermal Environment:

    1. During 98% of the standard occupied hours of the year, 95% of regularly occupied spaces achieve thermal conditions representing Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) levels within +/- 0.5; PPD ≤ 10% (as per ASHRAE 55-2013, ISO 7730: 2005 or EN 15251:2007).[1,33,34] Project describes outdoor weather conditions under which PMV and PPD levels would not be achieved, including historical weather data demonstrating that they are not expected to occur more than 2% of standard occupied hours per year.

    2. During all standard occupied hours of the year, all regularly occupied spaces achieve thermal conditions representing Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) levels within +/- 0.7; PPD ≤ 15%.

    3. Projects submit assumptions of clothing insulation and metabolic rate (and for projects using the elevated air speed method, air speed at a height between 0.6 and 1.7 m [2 to 5.6 ft]) used in design calculations.

 

  • Monitor Thermal Parameters:Conduct ongoing monitoring according of the dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, and mean radiant temperature are monitored in regularly occupied spaces within the building at intervals no less than twice a year (once in winter and once in summer season), and results are annually submitted through WELL Online. 

Intent: Enhance thermal comfort and promote human productivity by ensuring that a substantial majority of building users (above 80%) perceive their environment as thermally acceptable.

This WELL feature requires p rojects to provide high levels of thermal comfort through compliance with design requirements or by determining occupant satisfaction through a survey

  • Enhance Thermal Environment: During all standard occupied hours of the year, all regularly occupied spaces achieve thermal conditions representing Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) levels within +/- 0.5; PPD ≤ 10% (as per ASHRAE 55-2013, ISO 7730:2005 or EN 15251:2007).
  • Achieve Thermal Comfort: A post-occupancy survey is administered at least twice a year, including once in June, July or August and once in December, January or February.  All regular building occupants are invited to participate in the anonymous survey.  Responses are collected from at least at least 80% of the total occupants.  The survey includes an assessment of overall satisfaction with thermal performance and identification of thermal comfort-related issues.

Intent: Maximize and personalize thermal comfort among all individuals.

This WELL feature requires projects to improve thermal comfort of people in the space through the provision of personal thermal comfort devices and flexible dress codes that ensure individual thermal preferences are met.

  • Ensure Personal Thermal Comfort

    1. In all regularly occupied and shared spaces within the same heating or cooling zone, can accommodate upon request at least 50% of the regular building occupants at one have access upon request to personal thermal comfort devices that provide individual user control of air speed, air temperature and/or mean radiant temperature, per requirements specified 

    2. All rooms with a heating and/or cooling system that are regularly occupied by a single occupant allow the  occupant the ability to adjust the temperature or access to personal thermal comfort devices.

 


 

Comfort

 

 

 


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 Last Modified 12/13/18